Krisztina Lakatos

Contacts

Phone: +36 1 382 6822
Institute: Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology
Group: Sound and speech perception Research Group
Office: D4.12B

Curriculum vitae

Education and degrees

2003              Ph.D. in Behavioural Sciences

School of Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

Thesis, ’Temperament and Attachment: Individual Differences and Developmental Pathways’, supervised by J. Gervai, Ph.D.

1995               M.Sc. in Biology

Faculty of Natural Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

Thesis:  ‘Analysis of preschool children’s behaviour during free play’, supervised by J. Gervai, Ph.D.

Employment

2008                            senior research fellow, Research Institute of Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary (renamed in 2012: Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology,

                                      Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary)

2006                            research fellow, Research Institute of Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

2005 – 2006             scientific officer, Research Institute of Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

2004- 2005,              part-time Dozent, Institute of Psychology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany

2003 – 2006             post-doctoral research fellow, Research Institute of Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

1998 – 2003              research assistant, Research Institute for Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

Maternity Leave

2015-2016                  maternity leave

Scholarships and decorations

2003-2006                  Postdoctoral Research Fellowship awarded by the Hungarian Science Fund (OTKA)

2005                              Outstanding Research, Bolyai Award Committee, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

2002                              Excellent Young Researcher Prize awarded by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

2001-2003                  Grantee of the Bolyai Award for Young Scientists, provided by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

2000                             British Chevening Scholarship

Visiting Scholar at the Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour (3 months), University of Cambridge, UK

1999                              Visiting Academic at Christ Church College (1 month) University of   Oxford, Oxford University Hospitality Scheme (UK)

1993-94                        TEMPUS scholarship, University of Reading, Reading, UK

Further training

2003                Trained to reliability in the AMBIANCE coding scheme by Dr K. Lyons-Ruth, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA.

2002                Training in the Manchester Child Attachment Story Task (MCAST) by J. Green, R. Goldwyn and C. Stanley, Manchester University, Manchester, UK.

1996                “Coding Mother-Infant Interaction”  workshop on current issues of methodology organised by H. Rauh, U. Ziegenhain, L. Wijncrox, University of Potsdam (Potsdam, Germany)

1995                Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID II) training, Budapest, Hungary

Grants (as a PI)

2014-2018 „Epigenetic changes from infancy to adolescence in response to socio-emotional environment” Hungarian National Science Fund, Grant No. K 108882

2005-2008 „Associations of childhood behaviour problems with genetic variations in dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission” Hungarian National Science Fund, Grant No. F 049227

2003-2006 „Genetic risk and maternal behaviour in the development disorganized attachment in infancy.” Hungarian National Science Fund, Grant No. D 45940

1999-2000 “Investigation of the relationship between infant temperament and D4 dopamine receptor [D4DR] genotypes“, Hungarian National Science Fund, Grant No. F 030075

Research topics

My doctoral research was aimed at investigating individual differences in infant temperament and attachment to the mother. Possible genetic background of infant behaviour (allelic variations of genes encoding dopamine receptors and the serotonin transporter) was also investigated in collaboration with the Molecular Genetic Group lead by M. Sasvari, Medical University, Budapest (“Investigation of the relationship between infant temperament and D4 dopamine receptor [D4DR] genotypes” supported by the Hungarian Science Fund, Grant No. F 030075, PI, 1999-2000). The research was carried out as part of a larger longitudinal study following the socio-emotional development of 103 healthy first-borns from birth (low-risk community sample, Budapest Infant-Parent Study, 1st wave 1995-1999).

I was involved in further waves of the Budapest Infant-Parent Study (BIPS):

(a) First-born children’s temperament and attachment quality were assessed again at 6 and 7 years. Attentional processes were investigated by behavioural and brain functioning (ERP) measures at the same age. Temporal stability and associations among these measures and the genetic variability were investigated. Information on family processes, stressful life events, and parental worries, parenting behaviour completed our model on child development.

b) The same children and their mothers were invited to the lab at the child’s age of 17 again. Adolescent social functioning, symptoms of psychopathology were assessed and related to current executive functions, stress regulation, emotion processing and predictive models including variables from infancy and childhood are being developed.

The Budapest Mother and Baby Study, based on the results of the BIPS, aimed at deciphering the etiology of disorganized attachment by studying infant stress regulation, emotion processing, genetic and epigenetic markers and maternal behaviour.

Currently, I am developing a research project on developmental trajectories of executive functions in low and high-risk populations in collaboration with Dr Holmboe (University of Oxford). Both environmental and genetic factors will be studied, and behavioural measures will be coupled with age-appropriate brain imaging methods.

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