Lucia Wittner

Contacts

Phone: +36 1 382 6807
Institute: Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology
Group: Comparative psychophysiology Research Group
Office: D4.03B

Curriculum vitae

Personal information

Name: Lucia Wittner

Date and place of birth: 1975., Budapest, Hungary

Nationality: Hungarian

Contact: Research Center for Natural Sciences, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology

Magyar tudósok krt. 2. 1117 Budapest, Hungary

Telefon/Fax: 382-6807/382-6295

 

Education

 Ph.D.:                          Neurosciences, 2004., Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary, Thesis title: Hippocampal interneurons in human temporal lobe epilepsy: differentiated changes of perisomatic and dendritic inhibition. Supervisors: T. F. Freund and Zs. Maglóczky, Department of Functional Neuroanatomy, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Master’s degree:          Biology (specialized in cell-, developmental and neurobiology) and French translator specialized in biology, 1999., Biology teacher, 2000., Eötvös Loránd University, Faculty of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

Secondary school:        Kölcsey Ferenc Gimnázium, 1994. French-Hungarian two educational language class, Budapest, Hungary

 

 

Language exams

English, intermediate level, specialization in natural sciences, 1999.

French, advanced level, 1991, 1993; specialization in natural sciences, 1998.

D. A. L. F. (Diplôme Approfondi de Langue Française), 1993, 1997

German, intermediate level, 1994.

 

 

Research experience

 2012-present                Senior research fellow in the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Research Center for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

2010-2011                    Senior research fellow in the Institute for Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Department of Psychophysiology, Budapest, Hungary

2006-2010                    Research fellow in the Institute for Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Department of Psychophysiology, Budapest, Hungary

2004-2006                    Postdoctoral position in the laboratory of R. Miles, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U739, Université Paris VI., Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France

2002-2004                    Ph.D. student in Neurosciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary, Department of Functional Neuroanatomy, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Science

2001- 2002                   Research associate in the laboratory of Gy. Buzsáki, in the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey, USA

1999-2001                    Ph.D. student in Neurosciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary, Department of Functional Neuroanatomy, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Science

1996-1999                    Student research assistant, Department of Functional Neuroanatomy, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Science

 

 

Awards / Fellowships

2018                Fellowship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences for researchers having children

2009-2010      Balaton Project Fellowship, French-Hungarian Government, F16/2008

2008-2011       Bolyai Fellowship of the Hungarian Government, Budapest, Hungary

2008                 FENS 2008, Geneva, Switzerland, IBRO Travel grant

2007-2008      Balaton Project Fellowship, French-Hungarian Government, F38/2006

2006                 FENS 2006, Vienna, Austria, FENS Travel grant

2005                  NATO Short Term Research Fellowship, Budapest, Hungary 4024/NATO/03

2004-2006      INSERM Poste vert, Postdoctoral Fellowship of the French Government, Paris, France

2004                  FENS 2004, Lisbon, Portugal, FENS Travel grant

2002                  FENS 2002, Paris, France, FENS Travel grant

2002                  FENS Winter School Kitzbühel, Austria, Semmelweis University Ph.D. School travel grant, Budapest, Hungary

2002                  Best Bursary Award, 5th European Congress of Epileptology, Madrid, Spain

2000                  FENS 2000, Brighton, United Kingdom, Pro renovanda cultura hungariae travel grant, Budapest, Hungary

1999-2000       Scholarship of the Hungarian Government (Köztársasági Ösztöndíj), Budapest, Hungary

1999                  The Graduating Thesis won the prize of Sigma Aldrich Ltd. on the National Scientific Congress for Undergraduate Students (OTDK), Debrecen, Hungary

 

 

Participation in Research Grants

2016-2020        OTKA K119443, Hungarian Government, Hungary, Principal Investigator: Lucia Wittner

2016-2019        OTKA PD121123, Hungarian Government, Hungary, Principal Investigator: Kinga Tóth

2013-2017        NeuroSeeker EU FP7 Integrated Project, EU, Principal Investigator: Patrick Ruther

2012-2015        NKTH-ANR Multisca, French-Hungarian Governments, Hungary, Principal Investigator: Balázs Rózsa

2010-2013        NKTH-ANR Neurogen, French-Hungarian Governments, Hungary, Principal Investigator: László Acsády

2010-2013        OTKA K81357, Hungarian Government, Hungary, Principal Investigator: István Ulbert

2009-2013        OTKA PD77864 Hungarian Government, Hungary, Principal Investigator: Lucia Wittner

2006-2009        NeuroProbes EU FP6 Integrated Project, EU, Principal Investigator: Herc P. Neves

2006-2008        ETT135/2006, Ministry of Health, Hungary, Principal Investigator: István Ulbert

2005-2008        OTKA T049122, Hungarian Government, Hungary, Principal Investigator: István Ulbert

2005-2008        RET05/2004 Hungarian Government, Hungary, Principal Investigator: Tamás Freund

2005-2007        ANR INSERM U739, French Government, Principal Investigator: Richard Miles

2000-2003        OTKA T032251, Hungarian Government, Hungary, Principal Investigator: Tamás Freund

 

 

Neuroscience schools attended

 September 2003: IBRO/FENS Summer school, Dubrovnik/Zagreb, Croatia, Development and Plasticity of the Human Cerebral Cortex

December 2002: FENS/Hertie Winter school, Kitzbühel, Austria, Dynamic aspects of brain functions: Methodologies, concepts, models

August 2002:      IBRO Summer school, Prague, Czech Republic, Contemporary Approaches to the Study of CNS Functions

 

 

Conference organization

NeuroProbes EU FP6 project, 6th General Meeting, Budapest, Hungary, 2008.

 

Research topics

Synchronisation processes in the human cortex

Epilepsies are thought to be associated with neuronal hypersynchrony, resulting in the generation and maintenance of interictal activity and seizures. In vitro interictal-like activity has been shown to be spontaneously generated in epileptic human tissue. We aim to reveal cellular and network properties of spontaneous synchronous population activities emerging in surgically resected cortical tissue slices derived from epileptic patients and from tumour patients without epilepsy. We uncover the behaviour and role of different excitatory and inhibitory cell types in the generation and maintenance of population events using simultaneous intra- and multiple extracellular electrophysiological recordings, and two-photon imaging. Furthermore, we intend to reveal abnormalities in macro- and microcircuits in the human cortical tissue that might be causally related to seizure activity, using two photon imaging and correlated light- and electron microscopy. We expect our results to clarify the changes in excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks in the epileptic human tissue, and their role in the generation and/or maintenance of synchronous population events, as well as to elucidate subtle differences between normal and pathological activities.

 

Information spread in the hippocampus of rodents

Hippocampus is part of the archicortex of mammals, and is thought to have an important role in processing spatial, as well as memory information. Synchronous events called sharp-wave ripple complexes are generated in the hippocampus and are thought to take part in memory consolidation. We investigate the cellular and network mechanisms of sharp-wave ripple complexes in vitro, with multiple channel linear microelectrode recordings. Our results reveal how the different excitatory and inhibitory cell types of the hippocampus participate in the generation and spread of synchronous events. Analysis of the synchrony propagation between the different regions of the hippocampus will help us to better understand the information processing related to hippocampal activity.

List of publications

List of publications
X